Generic Links

TOP 10s


To find out more about us visit:
RL360 Public | RL360 Adviser

Cricket World Cup most memorable moments

TT infographic

The 12th cricket world cup is taking place in England over June 2019, with England fancied by many to achieve their first Word Cup win. They’ll face stern challenges from 2 times winners India and 5 times winners and current holders Australia. RL360 looks back at the previous 11 tournaments to pick out our 10 most memorable Cricket World Cup moments.


1979 – Viv Richards puts England to the sword

1979 – Viv Richards puts England to the sword

West Indies entered the 1979 final against England at Lords as overwhelming favourites. They had won in 1975 and had only ever lost 1 World Cup match. But England’s bowlers reduced the Windies to 102-4, and England smelled blood. But a superb unbeaten 139 from Viv Richards took the game away from England, and Windies ran out comfortable winners by 92 runs. Richards’ 139 remains the highest individual score in a final.


1983 – India humble “invincible” West Indies

1983 – India humble “invincible” West Indies

No one gave India a chance in the 1983 final. The view was re-inforced at “half-time”, after India had laboured to just 183 in their 60 overs. West Indies were in full control in reaching 50 for 1, with Viv Richards in majestic form. However, Richards then skied one and Indian captain Kapil Dev circled under the ball for what seemed an eternity before taking the catch over his shoulder. It sparked a collapse and India romped home by 43 runs.


1987 – Gatting reverse sweep costs England

1987 – Gatting reverse sweep costs England

England were on course to win the first World Cup held outside England when a moment of madness turned the game. Chasing 254 in the final against Australia in Calcutta, England were cruising at 135-2 when Gatting went for a risky reverse sweep and top edged to the keeper. English wickets continued to fall and they fell agonisingly short, losing by 7 runs in the closest ever World Cup final.


1992 – 22 runs off one ball

1992 – 22 runs off one ball

In a tight semi-final, South Africa required 23 runs off 13 balls to pip tournament favourites England to the final. A 12 minute rain delay took the players off the field, and would mean a rain adjusted target. The scoreboard flashed up the barely believable revised target of 22 runs required from just 1 ball. South Africa were knocked out in their first Word Cup, after being admitted following the end of Apartheid.


1992 – Pakistan roar to victory

1992 – Pakistan roar to victory

England had been the best team in the tournament. Pakistan scraped through to the final. Pakistan batted first at the MCG in front of 95,000 spectators, in the first day/night final. Some late hitting from Wasim Akram took them to a strong total of 249. England, in their third final in 4 tournaments, lost wickets regularly, including talisman Ian Botham for a duck, as Pakistan and captain Imran Khan took the trophy by 22 runs.


1996 – Sri Lanka come of age

1996 – Sri Lanka come of age

Australia were a team of stars – with captain Mark Taylor, the Waugh twins, Ricky Ponting, Shane Warne and Glenn McGrath at the peak of their powers. Despite posting a decent target of 242, and then reducing Sri Lanka to 23-2, Sri Lanka’s dashing batsmen, led by de Silva’s elegant unbeaten century, ensured Sri Lanka won comfortably by 7 wickets.


1999 – South Africa throw it away

1999 – South Africa throw it away

The semi-final at Edgbaston, between Australia and South Africa, was described by Wisden as “the greatest one-day international of all-time.” Chasing 213 to win, South Africa needed 1 run with 4 balls remaining, and the last pair at the crease. With still 3 balls to go, batsman Lance Klusener set off for a suicidal run and was run out. Australia went on to win the final, and followed that by winning the 2003 and 2007 tournaments as well. South Africa, despite getting to 4 semi-finals, are still to reach a Final.


2003 – “the death of democracy” in Harare

2003 – “the death of democracy” in Harare

The bravest moment in World Cup history took place in 2003 in Harare, Zimbabwe. Protesting against the oppressive regime of Robert Mugabe, Zimbabwe’s first black player – Henry Olonga – and their best player – Andy Flower – wore black armbands and released a press release denouncing “the death of democracy in Zimbabwe” in their opening game against Namibia. Neither player was ever picked for Zimbabwe again. Both were forced to leave Zimbabwe and live in exile in England.


2011 – minnows shock England

2011 – minnows shock England

When England faced Ireland in a group match in Bangalore, it was a classic David and Goliath situation. England, 5 times semi-finalists, batted first and racked up an impressive 327. Ireland, in only their second World Cup, staggered to 111-5. Then unheralded played the most extraordinary innings in World Cup history. He smashed England for 113 runs from just 63 balls, inspiring Ireland to an unlikely 3 wicket win with 5 balls to spare.


2011 – “the little master” finally lifts the World Cup

2011 – “the little master” finally lifts the World Cup

Sachin Tendulkar, India’s finest ever cricketer, was playing his 6th and final tournament in 2011. India reached the final, played in front of Tendulkar’s home crowd in Mumbai, against Sri Lanka. India had to chase a challenging 275 and were carried to victory by their captain MS Dhoni. As India celebrated, Tendulkar was held aloft by his team mates in front of an emotional Mumbai crowd. Fellow player Virat Kholi summed up the feelings of a grateful country when he said: “Tendulkar has carried the burden of a nation for 21 years. It was time we carried him.”